The ONE Food Rule That Will Change Your Life

I know that changing your life is a big promise, but here’s the thing…eating doesn’t really have to be all that complicated.

Even as a nutritionist and professional in healthy eating sometimes I have to be reminded of good food rules.  On occasion I will pull out my massive book stash and see what message my intuition leads me to.  

“The Body Ecology Diet.” by Donna Gates

I begin to flip through the book.  I know I am a big fan of fermented foods already which is very important in this diet, but then I land on a page with a very simple, yet profound message.  

“Stop eating when you are 80% full.  Leave 20% left for digestion.”

WOW.  I mean I think it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out that we all tend to overeat at least on occasion because we want to make sure we are full.  We also know we probably shouldn’t.  The reason why is what I find so interesting.  Our digestive system NEEDS room to do it’s work.  

We NEED room in our stomach to digest our food.  We shouldn’t be topping off our stomach like a gas tank.  Doing this just doesn’t show our body love.  

Digestion is SO important to our health.  If we are not digesting food properly than we are not assimilating nutrients correctly and this leads to lots of health issues.

Children with Down syndrome are already at a disadvantage when it comes to digestion.  They lack stomach acid and digestive enzymes.  This is a couple of the reasons so many of our kids end up on heartburn or constipation medication. 

My biochemistry professor always used to joke that we live in the land (America) of “overnutrition.”  In other words, we are getting more macronutrients which are the fats, carbs, and proteins then we need, but we are falling very short on micronutrients which are those precious vitamins and minerals.  

Too much food, but not enough nutrients.  It’s a huge problem and is exasperated by our love for food like substances such as processed foods and fast foods like McDonalds.  

We are sick and our children are sick.  

Did you know our children are the first generation in history that are not expected to live longer than we will?

Let that sink in for a minute.  Our children are going to have a shorter lifespan then us.

I’m not ok with that and that is why I do what I do.  

If you need help reach out.  I can be reached via email gail@blissnutritionct.com.

If you haven’t already grabbed your copy of “The Bliss 21 Club Mama Guide,” created for mom’s who have a child with Down syndrome.  Do it now!  It’s filled with practical health/wellness advice.

Eat nutrient-dense foods till 80% full.  Set the example and hopefully your kiddos will follow!

In abundant health,

Gail

 

 

Share

3 Foods That Will Boost Those Happy Chemicals in Kids with Down syndrome

There are many brain chemicals also known as neurotransmitters that affect behavior and that are altered in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome.  For our purposes today we will be focusing on serotonin and how we can use foods to influence this brain chemical.

According to Wikipedia, Serotonin is a monoamine neurotransmitter and is popularly thought to be a contributor to feelings of well-being and happiness.  You may recall that some anti-depressants such as Prozac affect a person’s serotonin level, but is it possible to raise serotonin with plain old food?

It has been well researched that individuals with Down syndrome tend to have lower levels of serotonin.  So what can we do food-wise to address this?  I want to be very clear here.  Diet alone very well may not be enough to increase serotonin levels to normal levels especially those with Down syndrome, but eating these foods should help and certainly worth a shot!

 Foods don’t technically contain serotonin, however, they do contain tryptophan which is the precursor to serotonin.  Be sure to eat these foods with healthy carbohydrates such as sweet potato, oats, brown rice, or if tolerated sprouted whole grains to help with absorption. 

  1. Wild Salmon- Please, please, please no matter what you do be sure you are buying wild salmon.  Why?  Farm-raised salmon are not only not as nutrient-dense but they may contain toxic ingredients such as artificial food coloring that is added to their food to make you think they are consuming their natural diet of krill.  This is a lie! Krill are small bright orangey-red fish that is the wild salmons natural diet giving them that pinkish/reddish/orangish color.  Wild salmon contains around 400 milligrams of tryptophan and is also a great source of omega-3 fatty acids which are also great for brain health..
  2. Pastured Eggs- Notice I didn’t say free-range or organic, although those eggs are healthier than factory-farmed also known as “regular” eggs, but the goal is really to get pastured eggs.  Why?  They are far more nutrient-dense and taste better too!  When chickens are allowed to eat from their natural environment their egg yokes will become a firm, bright orange versus pale yellow that falls apart.  Also please stop throwing out the yoke as it is the most nutrient-dense part of the egg.  Egg yolks have very high levels of tryptophan and as well as choline which is a crucial nutrient for individuals with Down syndrome.
  3. Nuts/Seeds- Ok so the one caveat to this is please make sure to properly prepare them.  Nuts/Seeds need to be soaked and then dried on low temperature preferable using a dehydrator.  This will reduce the phytic acid levels that are in most nuts/seeds.  Phytic acid affects how our bodies are able to absorb nutrients.  All nuts/seeds contain tryptophan so choose your favorites and keep in mind that peanuts are legumes and are also moldy so not recommended.  Almonds should also be used with caution because they are pasteurized and therefore not as nutrient-dense as the rest.  I like to add brazil nuts to smoothies because they are kind of funky to eat but contain a large amount of selenium which is a necessary nutrient for proper thyroid function.  Since thyroid function tends to be an issue for so many individuals with Down syndrome this may be a good nut to give a try.  

I would love to hear from you!  What is your favorite way to serve these foods?  Comment below!

Also don’t forget to grab my “Bliss 21 Club Mama Guide.”  It’s the health/wellness I created just for mom’s who have a child with Down syndrome and completely FREE

In abundant health,

Gail

Share